[ home / bans / all ] [ qa / jp / cry ] [ aut ] [ f / ec ] [ b / poll ] [ tv / bann ] [ toggle-new / tab2 ]

/qa/ - Questions and Answers

Questions and Answers about QA

New Reply

Options
Comment
File
Whitelist Token
Spoiler
Password (For file deletion.)
Markup tags exist for bold, itallics, header, spoiler etc. as listed in " [options] > View Formatting "


[Return] [Bottom] [Catalog]

File:149fc0bdf0915e339cadb9c50f….png (4.94 MB,3016x4063)

 No.73312

How did streamers get so prevalent in modern society and what's the big pull of them? Is there any reason why people watch people play video games over doing anything else?

 No.73315

Streamers are just an evolution of let's players. People already like watching people play video games, but the interactivity and live-action nature of streams makes it more appealing to some people.

>Is there any reason why people watch people play video games over doing anything else?

This is a fallacy I see a lot when it comes to video games. No one would ever question a sports fan's dedication to watching their favorite team play and chastise them that they ought to play themselves, but for whatever reason people seem to think wanting to watch people play video games is a different thing altogether.

 No.73316

>>73315
>but for whatever reason people seem to think wanting to watch people play video games is a different thing altogether.
Well it is, very few people have the ability to play sports at a national level, but everyone can invest an hour a day to play a video game.

 No.73317

Probably the same reason people watch sports, they are simple and easy to amuse.

 No.73321

People don't watch sports for the same reason, it's the thrill of competition. Most gameplay streamers don't really compete when they're playing, in fact many of the popular ones can't even play well. Not to mention IRL/Chatting streamers who don't play games at all. Watching people play video games doesn't equate to watching sports in this sense, with the exception of e-sports and such.

 No.73322

File:1c8a6bfd17bc0af82aab7a5573….jpg (617.59 KB,1001x1400)

Watching people play video games achieves similar satisfaction as playing video games without actually playing them, while requiring less effort.
Participating in streams (live chat) makes them feel they are important by witnessing something and knowing that others know how they feel. Same kind of mentality why people reply to GETs on imageboards.

 No.73323

File:literallyme.png (308.71 KB,503x532)

>>73322
Replying to GETs on an imageboard is clearly the superior way of feeling belonging and communal bonding

 No.73324

>>73323
Fuck off.

 No.73326

>>73324
It is irony...

 No.73327

don't forget about all the poor children (or even adults sometimes) that either can't or won't pirate but still want to experience the newest flavor of the month game so they can talk with their friends. those people make up a sizeable chunk of the lets play and streamer audience

 No.73328

>>73327
Yeah, I was going to mention this. The internet is global these days and that includes a lot of impoverished nations. Not only that, but when I was a a kid we could rent games so our parents didn't need to spend $50 for us to experience a new game. (my family couldn't afford that, personally)

 No.73384

>>73312
The appeal of streamers is a mix of parasocial interaction and the entertainment ability of the streamer themselves. I'd say watching a streamer is less like watching sports and more like watching a comedian, though many also enjoy streamers for their gameplay ability, but I don't think this is too common.

 No.73387

It's sort of like what >>73384 said. Try to think of it more as putting on the radio as background noise when you're doing stuff.

 No.73388

It's because they're versatile. They're like podcasts with visuals; interactive letsplays; chatrooms with a video playing in the background, etc.




[Return] [Top] [Catalog] [Post a Reply]
Delete Post [ ]

[ home / bans / all ] [ qa / jp / cry ] [ aut ] [ f / ec ] [ b / poll ] [ tv / bann ] [ toggle-new / tab2 ]