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/aut/ - Autumn

Seasonal board for the Autumn Season

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File:__kisaragi_chihaya_idolmas….png (3.13 MB,2480x3507)

 No.288

Everything seems so messed up. The world keeps getting worse and worse. People are forced into more and more debt in order to get by. Giant companies cut costs, pass them off to consumers, and price gouge all to appease shareholders. People are forced to rent everything they have because it's not financially feasible to own anything anymore. Governments which are supposed to protect its citizens ignore it as they only seek to gain more power for themselves. The only way I see this getting fixed is an economic collapse to restart the system. But that will hurt a lot of people and take generations to recover. I like to think it's not as bad as it seems and my perception is just warped from secluding myself to imageboards most of my life, but every time I look at the real world, it just doesn't seem okay. I hope I'm wrong and everything isn't actually as messed up as I see it, but I'm not too confident in that....

I'm drunk and depressed right now and I don't know why I wrote this but I did. Thanks for reading my blog. Sorry.

 No.289

Governments are to blame for crime. Without a level field there's only one way up, and it's not the governmental system. Though potentially throwing away everything for that is a gamble that might not be worth the stakes

 No.290

the real causes of all these things you're whining about are much more esoteric and terrifying...

heh...
you're on level one anon

 No.291

File:[MoyaiSubs] Mewkledreamy -….jpg (228.73 KB,1920x1080)

Well... yeah. The good news is we'll be too old to fight in any major economic-related civil strife or those tied to resources.
But at least you can play video games and stuff. In previous eras you did not have such luxuries.

 No.292

It's actually easy to buy things and not have to rent them if you are not dumb.

 No.293

File:__original_drawn_by_gomenn….png (452.62 KB,750x601)

It's going to get better, surely, if you look at something more cheerful thing to look at.

 No.294

File:Total Credit Market Debt a….png (980.37 KB,8798x6691)

Your assessment is pretty accurate. I got curious a while ago about how bad private debt actually is, and it turns out it's nightmarishly bad. It really stuns me that it's not a topic talked about more. Obviously, people talk about the cost of education, and healthcare, but nobody really talks about just how bad things are over all. Now, with the coronavirus hitting, nearly 10-20% of people are unemployed nationwide, not counting the hundreds of thousands of people who have left the labor market all together. Not to mention, there's pretty regular reports about a looming eviction crisis -- nearly 30% of people across the country couldn't even make rent in May, and things definitely haven't gotten better economically since then despite whatever the now Fed-backed stock market implies. I can only imagine that that number has risen in the months since then. Private debt is probably completely ballooning way beyond the level it reached in 2008. It's definitely past 400% of GDP, at least.

>>289
Honestly, I agree with OP, a genuine market crash might be the best thing for the economy. As it currently stands, the government has created something called "moral hazard." Basically, financial institutions know on some level that regardless of how risky or economically damaging the decisions they make, because they're "too big to fail," the government is required to bail them out. In other words, Goldman Sachs could functionally bet the majority of their investor's capital in bingo cards, and when that inevitably fails to produce a profit, because the net sum of investments constitute such a large proportion of the capital in the economy, without government intervention a Great Depression-level event would follow with tens of millions of people being left homeless due to rapid foreclosures and bank failures as a result of the massive amount of accrued debt on the part of financial institutions. A very similar thing could be seen in the immediate weeks and months of the coronavirus pandemic; the only reason there was such concern over lack of ventilators, and masks and so on was because the bulk of the world's manufacturing is consolidated in China. China being closed down meant that what we had already was all we had, because next to none of the manufacturing our countries used to have still exists. Meanwhile, all of the same massive corporations who had shipped away the vast majority of manufacturing came begging to Congress for bailouts. That's another instance of moral hazard; despite this consolidation of the supply chain bearing a direct consequence, the same corporations who lead to this problem existing in the first place got paid billions of dollars all the while laying off millions of workers.

At this point, the only way to get rid of this moral hazard is to let the market fail, damned be the consequences if it shows that there will be real consequences. Besides, in such a case, there's next to no reason why the government shouldn't bail out the people while the corporations themselves fail.

 No.297

I deal with this by not thinking about it hehe
>>290
this reminds me I made a thread on 4/x/ today calling the users stupid schizos and gullible, it got deleted.

 No.298

>>297
Don't be mean to (likely) mentally ill people! It's not nice!

 No.299

if you exclude the kramervirus we're doing fine honestly
shit there was still a war in europe like 30 years ago

 No.300

>>299
Being able to live doesn't cut it in the current time. That's just because everyone can feed themselves. Being unmotivated, unproductive and unhappy is the current problem. N.American motivations for the longest time were which tribe they belong to. Everyone strived to be part of the collective and fought wars if their leaders demanded, but the more educated a person gets the less they want to follow the pack and either become a leader or an independent. Since the level of education of people has gone up due to the Internet and other tools the primitive social structure of top down government or powerful megacorps doesn't cut it. The average Joe doesn't want to work assembling cars but have meaning suited to their intelligence or charisma. Companies and governments however, don't want to form a group of independent humans working towards an abstract final goal, but a system of cogs working towards a final goal of profits for the tribe. Because of this, the independent minded people get less and have a harder time to understand themselves.

This could in part link back to the success of online communities in creating culture over advertising agencies which manage to only capture the minds of the previous generation.

 No.301

>>299
There's still a war in Europe right now and the wars of the past have merely been frozen, not resolved.

 No.302

File:1410437094001.jpg (60.74 KB,548x445)

>>288
I was listening to a weekly podcast today that deals with a lot of what you're talking about in terms of 'The Great Reset' and larger ramifications. I can't say that getting what I consider to be the reality of things is very comforting but at least you might be able to make a bit of sense of just why things seem as bad as they do.
https://www.alternatecurrentradio.com/episode-350-building-the-perfect-beast-with-guest-cory-morningstar/

 No.303

>>299
Where does this leave the celestial heroes? What an abysmal state of affairs, such a long period of peace and prosperity have left them bereft of a battlefield to display their prowess.

 No.304

File:__shinomiya_kaguya_kaguya_….png (556.4 KB,600x900)

>>298
gomen

 No.305

File:1583418518697.jpg (15.46 KB,349x421)


 No.306


 No.410

File:1602535598828.png (243.55 KB,531x391)

in a similar depressing note how does kissu come to terms with the fact that are entering an era in which it is too late to stop climate change and revert things to the way they were before? with potential ecological collapse hanging over the future and the worldwide conflicts and unrest that will occur as a result how is there even any concept of a future left? especially when those in power in major polluting companies couldnt care less

 No.411

File:finger.png (347.71 KB,600x387)

>>410
If you think about it positively, our warming of the climate will inevitably save us in the future when natural climate change kicks in to try and throw us into another ice age! So we'll have a good amount of time when that happens to figure something out.

 No.412

>>410
I'll fix it with world domination.

 No.413

File:yotsuba-shock.gif (18 KB,133x82)

>>410
eeeh? wasn't the goal to finish ruining the planet before we die?

 No.414

>>410
yes cattle, be demoralized

 No.415

>>411
We already are in an ice age, any age where there is permanently ice at at least one pole is deemed an ice age.

 No.416

>>410
War across the world is the normal mode of operation for human civilization
it's remarkable that we've or more accurately America has managed to impose such a far reaching and comprehensive global peace onto the major powers of the world. American withdrawal from world affairs and her realization that it doesn't make sense to protect the trade of hostile powers is a sign that the world is returning to "normal". It's just now "normal" will have include new ways of waging wara long with old ways. Climate Change will on serve to exasturbate, as you have pointed out but we must adapt and this was going to happen either natural or from us sooner or later. The Earth isn't a static system, it's dynamic and the future isn't always bright sometimes it sucks. You shouldn't give up because things look bad, you should strive to do what you can to make things better or keep things going; that is how you change the world.

 No.417

>>416
I don't know that I would go that far considering most of the conflict in the world either is a direct result of the actions of the US or the US just does not care because it's in Africa. Even the situation with Russia is entirely their fault, they agreed not to move NATO any further east, they agreed not to have NATO be positioned on the Borders of Russia in that way, yet here we are. Even the then Prime Minister of Australia, Australia of all places was angry about this and knew what it would do, even contacting the then US President to try to get him t stop.

The US could have brought or helped bring about a long lasting and stable peace, but it messed it all up in so many ways.

 No.418

>>417
Exactly, currently conflicts happen at the USA's approval either active or passive. American voters do not want to focus on foreign affairs and want to address domestic issues. On top of this some American partners are seen as freeloaders that are not offering America anything in return for access to the American market and their foreign security (NATO) and in some cases challenging American intrests (Euro creation to challenge the dollar). The US messed it up but at the same time other partners have been working to use the system to their own benefit too. It is in America's benefit to withdraw from most world affairs and unfortunately it is in most of the world's benefit for that to not happen. There isn't a compelling reason for America to use it's resources as it currently does to maintain this peace. American obsession with oil was keeping us involved in the Middle East and world affairs but with shale we now are a net energy exporter so Middle Eastern oil is needed as it once was. Say what you will about oil but it was keeping America personally invested in global affairs.

 No.419

File:600px-Evangelion_Sukhoi_fi….jpg (48.73 KB,600x192)

>>417
ok but imagine a world where Russia joined NATO
and there was a point where this was a vaguely realistic proposal

can you imagine....
omfg can you imagine

also alternative reality two: where russia joins the european union

 No.430

>>418
Since USA is a superpower, it is also the only thing for the elites to achieve what they want in the world.
However the elites don't really want USA as a superpower at all because its civilians are hard to manage, but USA is strong so they really have no choice. If a dictatorship with compliant civilians became a superpower the elites will get out of USA immediately since they can spend less resource on pleasing civilians.
They used communism as a tool to plant elite-friendly dictatorships, and they had success in USSR, but then Stalin came and their plan fell through. However China cooperated with then at that time, that's why elite-controlled USA started gave China lots of benefits during the Cold War.
They are still doing the process to make China stronger so it will become the replacement of USA as a tool to achieve their goals.

 No.431

>>419
Russia's a barbaric country with very few laws... they form economic deals with Germany for their gas and oil production but Scandinavia hates them and the EU requires regulations RUS can't achieve,

 No.435

>>430
Wrong, wrong, WRONG!

The US alongside the victorious Western powers invaded Russia to try and defeat the Reds. They didn't even recognize the creation of the USSR until the 30s, under Roosevelt. You're also very wrong about China... The US supported the Nationalists in Chinese Civil War, but they lost out in the 50s during the Truman administration. The US even directly fought against the Chinese during the Korean war. Relations only began to normalize with China during the Nixon administration as a calculation to split the Communist world. It then wasn't until Deng Xiaoping came to power when China began to economically liberalize and introduce market reforms. Then, during the ongoing process of US and Western de-industrialization, after the fall of the USSR, that the US passed a bill to permanently normalize trade relations with China, thereby opening the Chinese labor market to US corporations. Continued investment into China was done because manufacturing and labor costs were far below that of Taiwan and Japan, despite concerns over quality. At the time, it was also believed that investment into China would eventually lead to a sort of vassalized pro-US China that would give up Communist ideology and rhetoric. To some extent that has happened, seeing as China is currently a highly capitalist country, however, the US and the West had not considered that China's growth would come to match and perhaps surpass that of the US. At this late date, despite the increasing cost of labor and manufacturing, because China possess a highly integrated supply China, it's still more profitable than ever considering a return of domestic manufacturing. Rather, investors have instead begun increasingly looking to India and Vietnam.

Go back to 8gag with your Qanon-tier rambling.

 No.436

File:Screenshot_2020-12-10 Lowy….png (191.63 KB,1396x728)

UH oh, things don't look good for animeland either.

 No.437

File:Screenshot 2020-12-10 0828….png (133.63 KB,984x746)


 No.438

>>437
It's from the same report your one says October this was from a video dated to October 21.

 No.439

>>435
Stalin's Great Purge happened before USA recognition of USSR, not to mention back then UK was the superpower and it had already recognized USSR in 1924, 12 years before the Great Purge. USA didn't become a superpower until WWII. After the Great Purge, USSR and Nazi Germany had good relationship and signed an non-aggression pact and it was the Nazi that later started war first against USSR.
The USA supported the Nationalists in Chinese because KMT-controlled China was a pro-western dictatorship, which was always the case until the late 80s.
Nixon administration normalized relationship with China not because "to split the Communist world" because it was already split. China and USSR already had a bad relationship over nuclear bomb development, so it made sense that USA would cooperate with China to go against the anti-elite USSR.
Deng Xiaoping was the most pro-west ruler of China ever and his economic policy gave the elites a hope of China replacing USA as the world superpower, given the huge population of China. This is when the elite-controlled USA started to greenlight a series of economy policies that would help China become a superpower. China cooperated by keeping the labor cost down through dictatorship, therefore convincing the investors to transfer manufacturing to China.

 No.440

>>431
ukraine is much more corrupt and shittier country than russia but they are allowed in EU and even maybe NATO because of power politics
and at some point in history that could have been russia

 No.659

>>288
Every now and then I see this post and think it's something I wrote, but then I read: "I'm drunk and depressed right now" and realize it was someone else who had the exact same thought process as myself. That someone else thinks the same as me is a relief, but at the same time the conclusion is pretty depressing that we'd even think up this same thing in the first place...

 No.660

The world is only getting worse for the stupid, things are actually pretty good and what could be an issue is not actually going to cause any concern to any of the idiots that say they have to rent everything, as they are clearly too stupid and poor to be a part of anything that is actually under threat. The people who are forced into debt to get by are just stupid, it always cost more in the long run and they just can't manage money, it's easily financially feasible to own everything you have, in fact it's more financially feasible. If you are in debt to buy a house well that is a different matter but with interest rates so low and the housing market the way it is you really should not be complaining. Sure that effects the cost of renting in some areas too but then it's still easily within an average wage and other cost of life have actually gone down quite a bit(just look at the price of TVs now or even laptops compared to what they were 10 or 20 years ago, consumer goods are the cheapest they have ever been).

There are issues with the world, but they are not financial or economic. Not yet anyway, it's hard to predict what will happen in the future.

 No.661

File:a0000f912d5a9b197680bb8112….jpg (261.85 KB,750x960)

>>660
Nonsense.
Other than the fact that the essential cost such as shelter and food has only increased, you won't be able to keep any property in the near future now that the whole propaganda you mentioned is in place.
Behind every economic policy change are political and capital powers. When this is accepted by most people, it will become a law with no objection and the authorities then will use it to come down to rest of you who think you're smart. The increasing debt, welfare, and tax is only the start.

 No.662

>>294
wow that's amazing. no wonder they're so big and never crash. makes sense actually. i can't stand it, we really need a wide nation crash

 No.663

>>661
k

>>662
Things are bad now, but they could be worse. Relatively speaking, we're still living in fairly good times, at least in the America.

If a complete collapse happened, chances are very high we'd either end up in the same situation we're in now but worse, or fall under the control of an nation that's even more evil than we are like China.

 No.664

>>661
It's you that's talking nonsense... Of course costs go up, that's what they do over time, they are supposed to go up 1-2% every year. But as I mentioned other costs have done the opposite and come down sharply. And take of the tin foil hat.

 No.665

>>410
this is an unpopular view but i don't really care about climate change because i do not identify with the people who will inhabit this earth in the future. they will not be "me" in any meaningful sense, so i don't really care about what happens to them. the world falling apart is their problem, good luck with that i guess
this is obviously a pathological outlook but whose fault is that? atomization of society has been in progress for a long time now, this is just an obvious consequence of it. the thought of the material world dying does makes me sad in a sense but then i hate everyone who lives in it so much that it balances out

 No.666

>>288
I dont think thw world is getting worse, I think you're just become more aware of things that happen.

 No.667

Just break up the monopolies, liquidate the assets of the ultra wealthy, force resignations of nepotism appoints, and lock up their fortunes by setting withdraw limits.

Worked pretty well for Nippon. During the Post-war Economic Miracle a lot of economists projected that Japan would overtake the United States, much in the same way economists now think of China. The only reason they didn't was because their demographics caught up to them and the asset bubble was so far-reaching that it essentially put the country in a decades long period of economic stagnation, that combined with a currency re-evaluation that made Japanese products much more expensive than they had previously been.

 No.668

File:49611421._SX0_SY0_.jpg (43.17 KB,331x475)

>>667
Not this guy but to further follow up on this watch Princes of the Yen.
Despite me spending so much time learning about Japan I was totally oblivious to what molded them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5Ac7ap_MAY

I will give it fair criticism however in that it's more or less just one man's work.

 No.669

>>668
Speaking of one man's work, after watching that documentary it strikes me a lot of Adam Curtis's documentaries, this one is particularly related to the molding of the West.




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